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How do incomes, rents, race, and resources vary across neighborhoods?

Weave together the relevant data points

The data points can be woven together into a single narrative to show neighborhood variations across your jurisdiction. The narrative can be illustrated by converting/translating the data points in figures, tables, maps, or other visualizations that show how housing needs have changed over time or how they compare to other jurisdictions (e.g., the nation as a whole, the rest of the region, or other near-by jurisdictions) or even how needs vary across neighborhoods within your jurisdiction.

Prototypical presentation: a New York City example

The following example shows how data points can be displayed and woven together to show some of the variations across New York City neighborhoods. While each of the data points are displayed on separate maps for clarity, it can be possible to use different colors and shading to combine them together on the same map.

You can learn how to replicate these visualizations using data for your locality by clicking on the relevant visualization or by using the navigation column on the left to go the Visualization landing page where you will find a directory for all of the visualizations.

Neighborhoods in New York City facing rapid rent increases now includes those with heavy concentration of blacks and Hispanics and of poverty

Poverty tends to be concentrated in certain parts of New York City. For example, neighborhoods with the poverty rates of 30 percent or higher were clustered in the Bronx, and central and southern Brooklyn. Neighborhoods with low poverty rates below 10 percent included eastern Queens, midtown and lower Manhattan, and Staten Island.

Poverty rate by census tract in 2012-2016, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

FOOTNOTE: Census tract data is only available in five-year estimates (2012-2016 in this case). The estimates should be interpreted as an average rate over that time period.

 

Many of the same high poverty neighborhoods also have high concentrations of Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks.

Population by race and ethnicity by census tract in 2012-2016, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

FOOTNOTE: Census tract data is only available in 5-year estimates (in this case, 2012-2016). The estimates should be interpreted as an average rate over that time period.

 

Many of the predominately Hispanic and Black neighborhoods respectively in the Bronx, and Central Brooklyn also have relatively low rents (contract rent plus utilities of less than $1250 per month) compared to the citywide median gross rent of $1,380.

Median gross rent by census tract in 2012-2016, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

FOOTNOTE: Census tract data is only available in five-year estimates (2012-2016 in this case). The estimates should be interpreted as an average rate over that time period.

 

However, many of these same neighborhoods are also facing significant rent pressures with rents increasing at rates faster than for the city as a whole.

Change in median gross rent by census tract in 2012-2016, New York City

Source: Longitudinal Tract DataBase (LTDB), American Community Survey data (ACS) (via FactFinder)

FOOTNOTE: Census tract data is only available in five-year estimates (2012-2016 in this case). The estimates should be interpreted as an average rate over that time period.

 

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