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What are the specific housing needs of different household types (e.g. households with seniors, households with children, and single-person households)?

Weave together the relevant data points

The data points can be woven together into a single narrative to show the extent of the rental affordability problem facing seniors in your locality. The narrative can be illustrated by converting/translating the data points in figures, tables, maps, or other visualizations that show how housing needs have changed over time or how they compare to other jurisdictions (e.g., the nation as a whole, the rest of the region, or other near-by jurisdictions) or even how needs vary across neighborhoods within your jurisdiction.

What are the specific housing needs of different household types (e.g. households with seniors, households with children, and single-person households) (apartment complex)

Prototypical presentation: a New York City example

The following example shows how data points can be displayed and woven together to show the extent of the rental affordability problems facing seniors in New York City.

You can learn how to replicate these same visualizations using data for your locality by clicking on the relevant visualization or by using the navigation column on the left to go the Visualization landing page where you will find a directory for all of the visualizations.

Seniors in New York City face unique housing challenges

In 2016, there were over 700,000 senior-headed households (22.6 percent of all households) in New York City. This represented an increase of about 103,000 households between 2006 and 2016 while the number of non-senior-headed households remained relatively flat.

Number of households by age of householder, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

FOOTNOTE: To further demonstrate the size of the challenge of housing the growing share of senior households, locally available population forecasts could replace the data showing the recent rate of growth.

Between 2006 and 2016, the number of studio or one-bedroom housing units grew by only 56,000, indicating a potential shortfall of units that are most likely needed in light of the increase in senior-headed households. While the 2016 total of 1.3 million of studios and one-bedrooms well exceeded the number of senior-headed households, the increased demand by seniors could further aggravate the housing affordability challenges faced by seniors.

Number of studio and one-bedroom housing units, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

Low income households face special challenges finding affordable housing. Some 18.4 percent of seniors live in low income households, similar to the 18.9 percent rate for the population as a whole.

Poverty rate by age, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

The share of senior households paying more than 30 percent of their income rose to more than 60 percent in 2016, a rate that continues to exceed that for households as a whole.

Rent burdened households by age, New York City

Source: American Community Survey (accessed via American Fact Finder)

See also:
Households by senior status, New York City
Poverty rate by age, New York City
Rent burdened households by age, New York City

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